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Prof. Daniel Cherqui, MD, PHD

Prof. Daniel Cherqui, MD, PHD

Overview

Dr. Daniel Cherqui, one of the world's leading liver surgeons, has joined NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center as chief of a newly created section of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation.

Dr. Cherqui also holds appointments as professor of surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and adjunct professor of surgery at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

As chief of hepatobiliary surgery, Dr. Cherqui oversees a comprehensive surgery program for the liver, pancreas and bile ducts, including surgeries for malignant and non-malignant conditions. His appointment marks the expansion of the successful liver transplant program at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Dr. Cherqui brings considerable experience and expertise to his new role. In the last two decades he has performed more than 2,000 complex hepatobiliary and liver transplant procedures. He developed a laparoscopic technique for living-donor liver transplantation that dramatically improves donor recovery. He also helped pioneer minimally invasive techniques in liver resections in the treatment of cancer.

Source : Weill Cornell

 

Villejuif, France
Professor of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College, NYC, NY, USA
French / English

Videos

Work Experience

Head of Department Hepatobiliary Surgery & Liver Transplantation
Since 2010
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, NYC, NY, USA
Professor of Surgery
Since 2010
Weill Cornell Medical College, NYC, NY, USA
Head of Department Hepatobiliary Surgery & Liver Transplantation
Henri Mondor Hospital, Paris, France

Education

MD
Paris University Medical School, Paris, France
Residency
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, France
Fellowship
University of Chicago, ILL, USA

Pubmed

Predictive model for microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma among candidates for either hepatic resection or liver transplantation.
2019
Surgery Read it here Late hepaticartery thrombosis after liver transplantation: which strategy? A single-center retrospective study.
2019
Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation Read it here Evaluation of a micro-spectrometer for the real-time assessment of liver graft with mild-to-moderate macrosteatosis: A proof of concept study.
2019
Journal of hepatology Read it here

Professional Associations

International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Member European Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Board Member Transplantation Society Member